The Eye Has To Travel: A Look Behind Charlotte Kellogg’s Designs

 

Apparel by Charlotte Kellogg, Palm Beach, Fla.; Photo: Jacek Gancarz; Model: Tiffany

When you come across Charlotte Kellogg’s boutique in charming Via Amore along Worth Avenue, the story behind the clothing is as beautiful as the pieces themselves—luminous silks in easy-to-wear styles, staple pants, one-of-a-kind cashmere scarves and cocktail accessories that are exotic and fit the Palm Beach lifestyle effortlessly. These garments are the result of years of curating relationships not only with local South Floridian production resources, but also overseas fabric mills and small, artisan operations from Nepal to Paris.

Creating a clothing line is no small undertaking: it requires both tasteful design and the ability to create well-crafted products. Fabric quality, careful patternmaking, fit, and execution can make a garment either exquisite or clumsy, and it takes a skilled designer to balance these factors. What’s more, resources in the garment industry are not highly accessible, but this is exactly where Charlotte has excelled. Charlotte has turned curating her resources into a lifestyle; she travels extensively and combines personal travel with the search for local specialties, materials, and objects to bring back to her stores. In addition to splitting her time between Palm Beach and Newport, she frequents the fabric shows in Paris, spends time in New York and Los Angeles, and is often jumping on a plane to Kathmandu or Hanoi. Charlotte designs according to local traditions: she produces, to name but a few, hand-block-printed tunics in Jaipur, cocktail jackets from vintage wedding sarees in Udaipur, cashmere and silk printed sweaters with matching scarves in Kathmandu, and charmeuse evening slacks in Hanoi.

She also produces many of her garments—including all of the pants and linen blouses—locally in South Florida, and is currently featuring locally woven tapestry cocktail jackets in her boutiques. Each season, Charlotte introduces new colors for her Cotton Stretch and Silk Stretch Pants, and coordinates them with new prints on T-shirts and printed linen blouses. She also changes the colors each season for her taffeta blouses and carries just about every color possible of Dupioni pants. She does a good number of small production runs of printed sheath dresses, cocktail jackets, and pants, skirts, and shorts. Her talent for design keeps customers coming back, while her penchant for travel is what keeps them looking fresh.